Picture Book Review ~ The Girl Who Thought in Pictures

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I absolutely love learning about the lives of others, particularly women. And it’s an added bonus if someone can introduce me to an unsung hero, a person who did something relatively ordinary with their lives that ended up making a difference, or someone who slipped under the radar. Today I’ve got four fabulous women profiled in four fabulous picture books that I’m excited to share with you all.

First up we have The Girl Who Thought in Pictures, a brief biography of Temple Grandin, whose work with animal rights is unparalleled. Grandin is autistic and she’s used her experiences growing up and entering a male dominated workforce to bring awareness to both autism and women’s rights.  Written in rhyme and complete with a timeline, additional information after the story and even a note from Temple herself.

The Girl Who Thought in Pictures Book Review

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Girl Who Thought in Pictures

Written by: Julia Finley Mosca

Illustrated by: Daniel Rieley

Number of Pages: 32

Age Range: 5-10

Rating: 5/5

Next is Shark Lady: The True Story of How Eugenie Clark Became the Ocean’s Most Fearless Scientist. Eugenie Clark fell in love with the ocean and its creatures the first time she stepped into an aquarium as a child. She had a particular affinity for sharks who everyone else thought of as brutal and bloodthirsty. She spent her life studying the sharks in their natural habitats and making many valuable discoveries in the process. Written by Keating, an acclaimed zoologist in her own right, the book includes a timeline, shark facts and more.

Shark Lady Book Review

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Shark Lady

Written by: Jess Keating

Illustrated by: Marta Alvarez Miguens

Number of Pages: 32

Age Range: 5-10

Rating:  4.5/5

Dangerous Jane tells the story of peace activist Jane Addams. Inspired and touched by the various scenes of poverty she saw in many corners of the world, Jane founded Hull House in Chicago. Over twenty-five years she helped immigrants from many countries to learn skills and find jobs. At the onset of World War One she set off to lecture and convince the leaders of the involved countries to bring about peace. This lead her to being named the FBI’s “Most Dangerous Woman in America” and finally being the first woman awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. There’s back matter containing additional biographical information and photos.Dangerous Jane Book Review

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dangerous Jane

Written by: Suzanne Slade

Illustrated by: Alice Ratterree

Number of Pages: 32

Age Range: 5-10

Rating: 4.5/5

And last but not least is a little-known figure by the name of Lucile “Ludy” Godbold. In the early 1900s a new international meet called The Women’s Olympics was founded as a way for female athletes to compete. Ludy’s height and skill make her a natural on the field and thanks to the support of the students and faculty at Winthrop College she is able to venture to France for the 1922 games where she sets numerous records. When she returns home, she embarks on a life-long career of teaching athletics and is even admitted into the South Carolina Sports Hall of Fame. Back matter includes photos and further information on her life.

Long-Armed Ludy Book Review

Long-Armed Ludy

Written by: Jean L. S. Patrick

Illustrated by: Adam Gustavson

Number of Pages: 32

Age Range: 5-10

Rating: 4.5/5

 

If you’re looking to be inspired or to inspire a young reader, look no further than these four books!

Happy Reading!

One Reply to “Picture Book Review ~ The Girl Who Thought in Pictures”

  1. […] out this past post for another great book about Temple […]

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